American Exceptionalism and Human Rights

3 In foreign policy, the notion of American exceptionalism generally “holds that Americans deprecate power politics and old-fashioned diplomacy, mistrust powerful standing armies and entangling peacetime commitments, make moralistic ...

American Exceptionalism and Human Rights

With the 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq, the most controversial question in world politics fast became whether the United States stands within the order of international law or outside it. Does America still play by the rules it helped create? American Exceptionalism and Human Rights addresses this question as it applies to U.S. behavior in relation to international human rights. With essays by eleven leading experts in such fields as international relations and international law, it seeks to show and explain how America's approach to human rights differs from that of most other Western nations. In his introduction, Michael Ignatieff identifies three main types of exceptionalism: exemptionalism (supporting treaties as long as Americans are exempt from them); double standards (criticizing "others for not heeding the findings of international human rights bodies, but ignoring what these bodies say of the United States); and legal isolationism (the tendency of American judges to ignore other jurisdictions). The contributors use Ignatieff's essay as a jumping-off point to discuss specific types of exceptionalism--America's approach to capital punishment and to free speech, for example--or to explore the social, cultural, and institutional roots of exceptionalism. These essays--most of which appear in print here for the first time, and all of which have been revised or updated since being presented in a year-long lecture series on American exceptionalism at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government--are by Stanley Hoffmann, Paul Kahn, Harold Koh, Frank Michelman, Andrew Moravcsik, John Ruggie, Frederick Schauer, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Carol Steiker, and Cass Sunstein.

More Books:

American Exceptionalism and Human Rights
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Michael Ignatieff
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-10 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

With the 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq, the most controversial question in world politics fast became whether the United States stands within the order of international law or outside it. Does America still play by the rules it helped create? American Exceptionalism and Human Rights addresses this question
American Exceptionalism in the Age of Globalization
Language: en
Pages: 321
Authors: William V. Spanos
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-24 - Publisher: SUNY Press

Connects the American exceptionalist ethos to the violence in Vietnam and the Middle East.
American Exceptionalism
Language: en
Pages: 186
Authors: Deborah L. Madsen
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

American Exceptionalism provides an accessible yet comprehensive historical account of one of the most important concepts underlying modern theories of American cultural identity. Deborah Madsen charts the contribution of exceptionalism to the evolution of the United States as an ideological and geographical entity from 1620 to the present day. She
The Myth of American Exceptionalism
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Godfrey Hodgson
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-27 - Publisher: Yale University Press

The idea that the United States is destined to spread its unique gifts of democracy and capitalism to other countries is dangerous for Americans and for the rest of the world, warns Godfrey Hodgson in this provocative book. Hodgson, a shrewd and highly respected British commentator, argues that America is
The Rhetoric of American Exceptionalism
Language: en
Pages: 228
Authors: Jason A. Edwards, David Weiss
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-01-10 - Publisher: McFarland

The American experience has been defined, in part, by the rhetoric of exceptionalism. This book of 11 critical essays explores the notion as it is manifested across a range of contexts, including the presidency, foreign policy, religion, economics, American history, television news and sports. The idea of exceptionalism is explored