Theoretical Perspectives on Human Rights and Literature

Kingston, Jamaica: University of West Indies Press, 2006. Mutua, Makau. Human Rights: A Political and Cultural Critique. Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002, 2008. Naffine, Ngaire.

Theoretical Perspectives on Human Rights and Literature

What can literary theory reveal about discourses and practices of human rights, and how can human rights frameworks help to make sense of literature? How have human rights concerns shaped the literary marketplace, and how can literature impact human rights concerns? Essays in this volume theorize how both literature and reading literarily can shape understanding of human rights in productive ways. Contributors to Theoretical Perspectives on Human Rights and Literature provide a shared history of modern literature and rights; theorize how trauma, ethics, subjectivity, and witnessing shape representations of human rights violations and claims in literary texts across a range of genres (including poetry, the novel, graphic narrative, short story, testimonial, and religious fables); and consider a range of civil, political, social, economic, and cultural rights and their representations. The authors reflect on the imperial and colonial histories of human rights as well as the cynical mobilization of human rights discourses in the name of war, violence, and repression; at the same time, they take seriously Gayatri Spivak’s exhortation that human rights is something that we "cannot not want," exploring the central function of storytelling at the heart of all human rights claims, discourses, and policies.

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Theoretical Perspectives on Human Rights and Literature
Language: en
Pages: 318
Authors: Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg, Alexandra Schultheis Moore
Categories: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-03-01 - Publisher: Routledge

What can literary theory reveal about discourses and practices of human rights, and how can human rights frameworks help to make sense of literature? How have human rights concerns shaped the literary marketplace, and how can literature impact human rights concerns? Essays in this volume theorize how both literature and
Democratic Citizenship Education in Non-Western Contexts
Language: en
Pages: 134
Authors: Serhiy Kovalchuk, Anatoli Rapoport
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-30 - Publisher: Routledge

This book examines the issues of theorizing citizenship education research in non-Western societies that have embarked on democratic development after the fall of authoritarianism and colonialism. Despite a proliferation of studies on citizenship and citizenship education in non-Western contexts, there has been limited theorization of this research and little discussion
Human Rights, Inc.
Language: en
Pages: 436
Authors: Joseph R. Slaughter
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-08-25 - Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

In this timely study of the historical, ideological, and formal interdependencies of the novel and human rights, Joseph Slaughter demonstrates that the twentieth-century rise of “world literature” and international human rights law are related phenomena. Slaughter argues that international law shares with the modern novel a particular conception of the
Power and Law in International Society
Language: en
Pages: 182
Authors: Mark Klamberg
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-04-24 - Publisher: Routledge

When studying international law there is often a risk of focusing entirely on the content of international rules (i.e. regimes), and ignoring why these regimes exist and to what extent the rules affect state behavior. Similarly, international relations studies can focus so much on theories based on the distribution of
Stones of Hope
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Lucie E. White, Jeremy Perelman
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-10-25 - Publisher: Stanford University Press

Many human rights advocates agree that conventional advocacy tools— reporting abuses to international tribunals or shaming the perpetrators of human rights violations—have proven ineffective. Increasingly, social justice advocates are looking to social and economic rights strategies as promising avenues for change. However, widespread skepticism remains as to how to make