Practice and Politics of DIY Urbanism in African Cities

"Protracted economic crisis and enduring class stratification, often impacting a majority of Africa's city dwellers, has long seen residents draw on their own resources and skills, and adopt experimental approaches to sustaining a living ...

Practice and Politics of DIY Urbanism in African Cities

"Protracted economic crisis and enduring class stratification, often impacting a majority of Africa's city dwellers, has long seen residents draw on their own resources and skills, and adopt experimental approaches to sustaining a living and access to services in cities. This do-it-yourself (DIY) urbanism has normally been analysed through a developmental lens, and thus studied in isolation to responses to crisis in cities elsewhere across the globe. Editors Marr and Musasa take a cross-regional perspective, drawing upon areas with varying levels of state presence, to understand the dynamics of DIY urbanism in cities and for urban residents experiencing economic distress and marginalisation. The editors ask: Does DIY urbanism present a form of resistance or acquiescence to class stratification and other inequalities? Does it connote an acceptance of the withdrawal of social and public services that now follow the customary austerity policies enacted after economic crisis? What prospects across the varying actions of urban residents attempting to make a life are there for a radical politics that can make cities work better for its most poor and marginalised populations?."--

More Books:

The Practice and Politics of DIY Urbanism in African Cities
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Stephen Marr, Patience Mususa
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-12-02 - Publisher: Zed Books

Across Africa, protracted economic crises and enduring class stratification have impacted a majority of the continent's city-dwellers, meaning that urban residents are forced to draw on their own resources and skills, often adopting experimental approaches to sustaining access to services and livelihoods. This 'do-it-yourself' urbanism has generally been appraised through
Practice and Politics of DIY Urbanism in African Cities
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Stephen Marr, Patience Mususa
Categories: Electronic books
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher:

"Protracted economic crisis and enduring class stratification, often impacting a majority of Africa's city dwellers, has long seen residents draw on their own resources and skills, and adopt experimental approaches to sustaining a living and access to services in cities. This do-it-yourself (DIY) urbanism has normally been analysed through a
Gendered Institutions and Women’s Political Representation in Africa
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Diana Højlund Madsen
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-24 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

During the course of the past three decades efforts of democratisation and institutional reforms have characterised the African continent, including demands for gender equality and women's political representation. As a result, some countries have introduced affirmative action measures, either in the aftermath of conflicts or as part of broader constitutional
Transformations of Rural Spaces in Mozambique
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Cecilia Navarra, Cristina Udelsmann Rodrigues
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-18 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

With contributions from both Mozambican and non-Mozambican scholars of multi-disciplinary backgrounds and approaches, this book provides a range of new perspectives on how Mozambique has been characterized by profound changes in its rural communities and places. Despite the persistence of poverty in Mozambique, significant investments have been made in rural
Invisibility in African Displacements
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Jesper Bjarnesen, Simon Turner
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-29 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

African migrants have become increasingly demonised in public debate and political rhetoric. There is much speculation about the incentives and trajectories of Africans on the move, and often these speculations are implicitly or overtly geared towards discouraging and policing their movements. What is rarely understood or scrutinised however, are the