Theatre and Archival Memory

This book presents new insights into the production and reception of Irish drama, its internationalisation and political influences, within a pivotal period of Irish cultural and social change.

Theatre and Archival Memory

This book presents new insights into the production and reception of Irish drama, its internationalisation and political influences, within a pivotal period of Irish cultural and social change. From the 1950s onwards, Irish theatre engaged audiences within new theatrical forms at venues from the Pike Theatre, the Project Arts Centre, and the Gate Theatre, as well as at Irelands national theatre, the Abbey. Drawing on newly released and digitised archival records, this book argues for an inclusive historiography reflective of the formative impacts upon modern Irish theatre as recorded within marginalised performance histories. This study examines these works' experimental dramaturgical impacts in terms of production, reception, and archival legacies. The book, framed by the device of archival memory, serves as a means for scholars and theatre-makers to inter-contextualise existing historiography and to challenge canon formation. It also presents a new social history of Irish theatre told from the fringes of history and reanimated through archival memory. Dr. Barry Houlihan is an Archivist at National University of Ireland, Galway. He teaches theatre history and archival studies, digital cultures, and history. Barry is the editor of Navigating Irelands Theatre Archive: Theory, Practice, Performance (2019) and contributes regularly to RTE Brainstorm on topics of theatre, literature and cultural and archival heritage. .

More Books:

Theatre and Archival Memory
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Barry Houlihan
Categories: English drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This book presents new insights into the production and reception of Irish drama, its internationalisation and political influences, within a pivotal period of Irish cultural and social change. From the 1950s onwards, Irish theatre engaged audiences within new theatrical forms at venues from the Pike Theatre, the Project Arts Centre,
Documentation, Disappearance and the Representation of Live Performance
Language: en
Pages: 269
Authors: M. Reason
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-09-22 - Publisher: Springer

The documentation of practice is one of the principle concerns of performance studies. Focusing on contemporary performance practice and with emphasis on the transformative impact of video, photography and writing, this book explores the ideological, practical, and representational implications of knowing performance through its documentations.
Memory, Transitional Justice, and Theatre in Postdictatorship Argentina
Language: en
Pages: 239
Authors: Noe Montez
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018 - Publisher: SIU Press

In this work examining Argentine theatre over the past four decades and drawing on contemporary research, Noe Montez considers how theatre can serve as activism and alter public reception to a government addressing human rights violations by its predecessor.
The Routledge Companion to Theatre and Performance Historiography
Language: en
Pages: 496
Authors: Tracy C. Davis, Peter W. Marx
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-08-03 - Publisher: Routledge

The Routledge Companion to Theatre and Performance Historiography sets the agenda for inclusive and wide-ranging approaches to writing history, embracing the diverse perspectives of the twenty-first century and Critical Media History. Written by an international team of authors whose expertise spans a multitude of historical periods and cultures, this collection
South African performance and archives of memory
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Yvette Hutchison
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-11-01 - Publisher: Manchester University Press

This book explores how South Africa is negotiating its past in and through various modes of performance in contemporary theatre, public events and memorial spaces. It analyses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a live event, as an archive, and in various theatrical engagements with it, asking throughout how the