Whose Islam

Title: Whose Islam? : the Western university and modern Islamic thought in Indonesia / Megan Brankley Abbas. Other titles: Encountering traditions. Description: Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2021.

Whose Islam

In this incisive new book, Megan Brankley Abbas argues that the Western university has emerged as a significant space for producing Islamic knowledge and Muslim religious authority. For generations, Indonesia's foremost Muslim leaders received their educations in Middle Eastern madrasas or the archipelago's own Islamic schools. Starting in the mid-twentieth century, however, growing numbers traveled to the West to study Islam before returning home to assume positions of political and religious influence. Whose Islam? examines the far-reaching repercussions of this change for major Muslim communities as well as for Islamic studies as an academic discipline. As Abbas details, this entanglement between Western academia and Indonesian Islam has not only forged powerful new transnational networks but also disrupted prevailing modes of authority in both spheres. For Muslim intellectuals, studying Islam in Western universities provides opportunities to experiment with academic disciplines and to reimagine the faith, but it also raises troubling questions about whether and how to protect the Islamic tradition from Western encroachment. For Western academics, these connections raise pressing ethical questions about their own roles in the global politics of development and Islamic religious reform. Drawing on extensive archival research from around the globe, Whose Islam? provides a unique perspective on the perennial tensions between insiders and outsiders in religious studies.

More Books:

Whose Islam?
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Megan Brankley Abbas
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-08 - Publisher: Stanford University Press

In this incisive new book, Megan Brankley Abbas argues that the Western university has emerged as a significant space for producing Islamic knowledge and Muslim religious authority. For generations, Indonesia's foremost Muslim leaders received their educations in Middle Eastern madrasas or the archipelago's own Islamic schools. Starting in the mid-twentieth
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Pages: 336
Authors: Robert W. Hefner
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-08-31 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

This timely volume brings together fifteen leading specialists of the region to consider the impact of two generations of nation-building and market-making on pluralism and citizenship in Malaysia, Singapore, and indonesia.
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Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Ian Richard Netton
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-12-22 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

Offers a unique comparative exploration of the role of tradition in Islam and Christianity. The idea of 'tradition' has enjoyed a variety of senses and definitions in Islam and Christianity, but both have cleaved at certain times to a supposedly 'golden age' of tradition from the past. The author suggests
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Language: en
Pages: 440
Authors: Ahmad S. Dallal
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-04-20 - Publisher: UNC Press Books

Replete with a cast of giants in Islamic thought and philosophy, Ahmad S. Dallal's pathbreaking intellectual history of the eighteenth-century Muslim world challenges stale views of this period as one of decline, stagnation, and the engendering of a widespread fundamentalism. Far from being moribund, Dallal argues, the eighteenth century--prior to
A Sense Of Siege
Language: en
Pages: 193
Authors: Graham Fuller
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-12 - Publisher: Routledge

"The clash of civilizations" has become a common phrase in discussions of U.S.-Middle East relations. This book explores the nature of the friction between the Muslim world and Western states, looking at legitimate perceptions and grievances on both sides involving historical, political, economic, cultural, psychological, and strategic elements. Arguing that